This Just In: Amanda Palmer Continues to Be Both Cool and NSFW

(Extra-special warning about NSFW pictures and videos in this post!)

I was going to post a fun playlist to share with you-all today (all the cool kids are doing it), but I’ll be darned if I can figure out how to get the Grooveshark widget to work with WordPress. Maybe that’s why all the smart people are on Blogspot?

Anyway, in lieu of a playlist, here’s a video from one of my favorite musicians and body image warriors, Amanda Palmer.

If you didn’t catch the excitement when she was still with her old label, Roadrunner, here’s the lowdown: she was making this video for the song “Leeds United” after the release of her first solo album, “Who Killed Amanda Palmer,” and Roadrunner wanted to pull or redo certain shots of her because she “looked fat.” Her response was basically, “So what?” and there was a great deal of fan backlash towards Roadrunner, which included fans taking pictures of themselves with their abdomens exposed and posting them on a website in solidarity. Her blogs about it here and here , like most of her blogs, are good reading material, and exemplifies part of why I (and so many other fans) like her so much. She’s someone who’s proud of what she does and comfortable with who she is–she’s not shy about showing off her body or dressing in crazy sparkles or leaving her legs and pits unshaven when going to the Golden Globes.

Some of the fan comments from that time re: The Belly Thing are a little weird, being couched in the form of “SHE’S NOT FAT but if she was who cares?” The tacit acknowledgement both on the fans’ part and on her part that being called fat is an insult and buying into fat-hate is troubling, but nobody can say that Amanda is afraid of showing off her body:

via shamelessmag.com

Why hello there, Miz Palmer.

Mostly, I appreciate that she starts dialogues about this sort of thing, and that she engages the public so readily with her blog and Twitter account. She’s willing to talk about her body and how she sees it, and as I’ve been following her over the years (I was first introduced to her music my junior year of high school), her promotion of self-love and body-love has only grown in a way that I really appreciate.

For extra credit (and if you’re not at work), here’s a very NSFW music video for “Map of Tasmania,” a song about pubic hair:

What do you think? Too much? Not enough? What musicians do you think of as good body image warriors?

[Edit 3/20/15: I’ll leave this post up as it seems disingenuous to take it down, but I’d like to update this to say that my feelings about Amanda Palmer have gotten a lot more complicated in the last several years; I feel a lot of author Jenny Trout’s post about Amanda and her troubling behavior, and would like to direct you there for some eloquent thoughts.]

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7 thoughts on “This Just In: Amanda Palmer Continues to Be Both Cool and NSFW

  1. We can teach you how to work Grooveshark on WordPress, no problem. Don’t go over to the dark side (aka Blogspot) – trust me, the tears aren’t worth it.

    You’re my music fairy godblogger today. I’ve heard Amanda Palmer before, but I never knew who it was. Now I know and a new playlist is being built as I type (and probably as you read – I’m a slow playlist builder). And “Map of Tasmania” really needs to replace “va-jay-jay” in the world’s pseudonym list.

    • Mia says:

      If you would, I would be forever grateful. I tried to make it work but the HTML all broke down and I decided I’d rather just post a video or two and be done with it.

      Eee, I’m glad you like her! She’s a really cool person besides being a fantastic musician, so I’m always happy to get other people interested in her. I love seeing music posts on your blog, so they’ll probably become a more regular feature around here. “Map of Tasmania” is about 400% better than “va-jay-jay,” and only marginally longer to say.

  2. Marie says:

    I am so glad you are on WordPress not Blogspot! I live in China, and if you were on Blogspot I would not be able to read your posts because it’s blocked here. So I hope you don’t move to Blogspot.

    Have you guys heard of the Akinator? I just found it but it seems like something you’d enjoy. It’s a sort of genie figure who asks you questions in an attempt to guess what character you have in your mind. Sometimes he gets it with only a few questions. But if you stump him you get to teach him the character so he’ll know it next time. It’s at http://en.akinator.com/#

    He guessed ‘Jo March’ with only about 12 questions.

    • Mia says:

      Haha, don’t worry, I don’t think we have any plans to move. I’m happy with WordPress and plan on staying here for the foreseeable future, unless Tia has some ideas she isn’t telling me about.

      Oh, I haven’t played with that site in so long! What a fun reminder, thank you! I’ll have to think of some good stumpers for it.

  3. I totally have no plans for moving to blogspot. We can make magic work!

    So AFP. This was such an interesting backlash, and I remember reading on Shakesville some stuff about the implicit fat hatred going on in their commentaries and starting to really, really think about what fat hatred meant. It wasn’t just telling her she looked fat…it was also defending her for not being fat, since fat is a bad, bad thing to call someone. I want, one day, to live in a world where calling myself fat doesn’t gain awkward sympathy noises, but instead a null reaction because it would be the same thing as saying I have freckles. Our bodies should not allow others to make moral judgments about us. Ugh.

    • Mia says:

      You’ve hit the metaphor on the other metaphor with this, I think. It’s the fact that everybody took it as such an insult–and they meant it as an insult, but you’re right in that we need to work on releasing “fat” from its negative connotations. It’s just become so normalized within our society that fatness is a negative attribute and that people aren’t complete somehow when they’re overweight, so the removal of any teeth that “fat” as a pejorative may have is a long time in coming. But it’s advocates like you and me who will help things change a little at a time!

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